2 min read  | Interviews, Politics

‘The regime is testing Western countries every day by using chemicals on different levels’


May 30, 2013

May 30, 2013

Dr. Mohamed, who works at the Adra field hospital, asked to referred to by his first name only for safety reasons. The alleged chemical attack in Adra last week was the third in two months. Ten cases were documented, two people died. The other eight were transferred by FSA to their field hospital.

Adra is the home of the Syrian Army’s Chemical Battalion and Brigade 39, which have been surrounded by the FSA-led Al-Islam Brigade for a month. The regime targeted the area where the FSA operates. Dr. Mohamed spoke with Ahmed Kwider via Skype.

Q: What happened in Adra?

A: The regime is trying to breach all the areas held by the rebels. They launched six Grad missiles within a limited area that were loaded with chemicals.

Q: Why was Adra targeted?

A: The area of the site targeted by chemicals is surrounded by the rebels and is entirely empty. The regime is using it as an excuse to attack civilians with chemicals and other types of weapons. As I speak to you now, we’ve been surprised with a strange toxic gas material. It’s unknown and it results in strange symptoms, including pupil expansion and fainting. I have dealt with six injuries that had these symptoms.

In addition to that, Adra is the gate to the eastern area, as it lies on the supply route that the regime is trying to recapture.

Q: Is the field hospital fully equipped?

A: We have first-aid materials, and we’re using Atropine, which is hard to find. The regime is fighting us by not allowing oxygen and medical supplies to get to us.

Q: What is the message received by the citizens of Adra?

A: This message is directed to all Syrians: So long as you shelter the terrorist groups, you will be exposed to killing and slaughtering. You can only declare loyalty to the regime by denouncing the armed terrorist groups.

Q: What is the possibility of more chemical weapons use?

A: The regime is testing Western countries every day by using chemicals on different levels. If international investigators come, they will need to exam the soil and the bodies, but sarin gas spreads and vanishes quickly.

Q: What are the difficulties you face with your patients?

A: The shortage of supplies. We need Atropine, and it’s possible I will lose patients due to the shortage of medical supplies. The regime has allowed us to receive some medical supplies to analyze blood type, but they were expired so we got incorrect results. That resulted in chaos and deaths.

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